How to find a job in Australia

We all know it is quite difficult to find a job in Australia.  I’ve searched for some good tips which you can use to find a job of your dream.

UNDERSTAND YOUR WORK RIGHTS AS AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT IN AUSTRALIA

Most student visas allow you to work for up to 40 hours every two weeks while your course is in session, and unrestricted hours during any scheduled course break, but before you undertake any paid work you need to make sure your visa allows you to work. Find out more at the Department of Home Affair.

Everyone working in Australia, including international students or those on working holiday visas, have basic rights at work. These rights protect entitlement to:

  • A minimum wage and superannuation.
  • Challenge of unfair dismissal from the job
  • Leave, breaks and rest periods.
  • A healthy and safe work environment.

To find out more about your work rights visit the Australian Government’s Fair Work Ombudsman’s website or call them on 13 13 94.

More information can be found here.

DO YOUR “HOMEWORK” AND RESEARCH ABOUT YOUR FUTURE DREAM EMPLOYER

When you apply for a job try to find out as much as possible about the company and the role.  Your application (CV, a cover letter) should be specially tailored to this position.  Employers are looking for candidates that have a real desire to work with them and aren’t just submitting 100 applications randomly. Try to find out the name of the person who will receive your application, so later you can follow-up on your job application.

READ AND ADDRESS THE JOB ADVERTISEMENT/DESCRIPTION CAREFULLY

Now the time to use your amazing reading skills! Most people can read a job description and job advertisement. However, only a few can understand the message and interpret the message through their application.

There are four main parts to any job description.

1. Values: How the employer works and what it expects of its employees. Check that you are comfortable with these.

2. Accountabilities: The day-to-day responsibilities and duties of the role. Your previous work history (which you put in your resume!) should have skills and experiences that are relevant for this role. For example: Job ad says “Experience in providing excellent food and beverage service” → you put in your resume 2 years (depends on your experience) experience as a waitress”

3. Key Selection Criteria: Often listed in the job description, these outline the qualities, knowledge and skills required for the role. Include specific examples or situations where you have demonstrated the qualities they are seeking.

4. Qualifications: Sometimes specific qualifications will be required and form part of the screening process for the employer.

MAKE A PERFECT RESUME AND COVER LETTER

VERY IMPORTANT! Ensure you save and submit your resume and cover letter as PDFs.

Resume: Your job history, starting with the most recent. Keep the descriptions short, to the point and relevant to the job you are applying for. CHECK GRAMMAR! For this and more visit our job workshop (every Tuesday at 2 pm, room 12 and 4.30 pm, room 7)

Cover Letter: Clear and easy to read; try and keep this shorter than one page. This is essentially a letter directed to the person responsible for hiring and will describe a little bit about yourself, why you would like to work with this particular employer and explain how your experience is relevant for the position you are applying.

Some good websites to check for ideas and examples of good resumes / cover letters:

AFTER YOU SUBMIT YOUR APPLICATION, FOLLOW IT UP

It’s OK to call your, hopefully, future employer and follow up on your application. That means that you are eager and have initiative. Plus, for international students, it’s a good opportunity to demonstrate English skills.

INTERVIEW

You got an interview → WELL DONE! It can be scary but the most important thing is to be prepared, be positive and be yourself.

During the interview you need to give examples of real situations in your work experience to demonstrate your competency for a task. Take your time to answer the questions properly; use the STAR approach.

S – Situation: Where and when you had the relevant experience.
T – Task: What was required of you for this experience.
A – Action: What you actually did.
R – Result: What was the POSITIVE result of your actions (For example: I solved a problem with customers and they were so happy with me that left me big tips).

WEBSITES TO FIND WORK:

Adzuna -Highly recommended job search engine. Also, has a great feature – ‘ValueMyCV’ to get a free, instant estimate of your market salary as well as tips to improve the quality of your CV.

Seek – Job Search, company reviews etc.

GradConnection – Graduate programs and internships.

LinkedIn – Professional networking and recruitment.

Facebook – Search for groups such as “Brisbane Bartender Exchange” for hospitality (or other) jobs in your area.

Check out this website  for more helpful articles.

Good Luck!

close up of human hand

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