Brisbane City Hall Tour

Lexis Brisbane students went on a walking tour of one of Brisbane’s most iconic buildings, the Brisbane City Hall, which used to be the tallest building in Brisbane.  From the clock tower, students could spot Lexis, (David is pointing to it in the picture below.)PicMonkey Collage city hall

Cambridge Mock Tests

Today our Cambridge FCE and CAE classes took their mid-course mock tests, which were done under exam conditions and allow both the students and their teachers to check the progress they are making throughout their course.  It was a hard day, but they made it through to the end.  Well done!cae

Dave’s TTT (Teaching Tips and Tricks)!

Grammar Books for Teachers.

For the majority of English language teachers starting out in the TESOL industry, there is one aspect of the job that scares the pants off us – teaching grammar. I’m not sure about you, but when I went through primary and secondary school, we weren’t taught English grammar, so when I first became an English language teacher in Hungary, notions such as subjects, objects, and past participles were, forgive the pun, foreign.  Not speaking a lick of Hungarian at the time, knowing that I needed to eat (and therefore make this teaching thing work), compelled me to set about teaching myself English grammar before I taught it to my students.

This week, I would like to share with you the grammar books that helped me at the various stages of my career. I don’t claim they are the best, as there are a lot of good reference books out there, but these are the ones I have used and still do use and so I can vouch for.

English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy – Cambridge University Press

This is a great book for new teachers with little grammar knowledge. The middle book in the series, this self-study reference book is pitched at intermediate level students. It consists of 145 two-page chapters covering the language structures that an intermediate student would need.

Each chapter starts with a page of ‘accessible’ presentations about the meaning, usage and form of the structures. I say ‘accessible’ because it is written for students, and therefore we teachers have a shot at understanding the content. This is a great starting point for new teachers. On top of this, the second page in each chapter has exercises for practice! No silly, not for you the teacher, but they are very handy for homework for your students. All in all, I would say this is a great book to get you started on your grammar teaching path and you will be able to refer to it and use it for years to come.

Notable mention – The Good Grammar Book by Michael Swan – Oxford University Press

Practical English Usage by Michael Swan – Oxford University Press

This book delves a little deeper into the English Language, providing fairly detailed information on grammar, vocabulary, idiom, style, pronunciation and spelling. I found I didn’t really appreciate this book until I had a slight grasp of the workings of the language. Sure I had used it in CELTA assignments, but that was about it. I found (and sometimes still find) that I used this book a lot more when dealing with students’ questions that were outside of what I was teaching in class that day. This is a great book that you will get years of use out of and it can (sorry, but I can’t promise more than that) sometimes stop you from looking silly in front of your class.

Notable mention – Grammar for English Language Teachers by Martin Parrott – Cambridge University Press

About Language by Scott Thornbury – Cambridge University Press

This is the book you turn to just before DELTA, to help bring out your inner grammar geek. The book consists of 28 ‘task’ units covering various aspects of the English language and looks at them in a high level of detail. The tasks really make you think about how English is used, and I must confess, when I began working through the book I had to look at the key and commentary a couple of times first to understand what exactly was being asked in each task. That brings me to the other great thing about this book – the commentary. It is easy to follow and a real eye opener. The way the language is analysed and applied to everyday usage is brilliant. It leaves you wondering a) just how smart is this Scott Thornbury bloke and b) surely he has better things to do. This is a must-have book for DELTA or MA level courses and a great source of PD for experienced teachers.

Anyway, that’s it for this week. Three grammar books to take you through your EFL teaching career, they have worked for me and I have a feeling they’ll work for you too.

DaveDave Fox is an experienced teacher and teacher trainer who has worked in Australia, the UK, and Europe

Brisbane Jobs

If you’re looking for part-time / casual work while you are studying English with us, check out these recent job advertisements in the Brisbane CBD.  Also, remember that at Lexis Brisbane we have a weekly Job Workshop every Tuesday from 2-3 pm.

coffee_353-300x0

Our teachers are students too!

 

Teacher Professional Development

At Lexis Brisbane, our teachers are always keen to put themselves in our students’ shoes.  We regularly have Teacher Professional Development sessions, where teachers share ideas and re-fresh teaching methods.  And to let you know… Yes, our teachers are excellent students!

PicMonkey Collage PD1 PicMonkey Collage PD2

Lexis Brisbane Welcomes 5 New Students – 28 January, 2014

Shohei, Nari, Hyeyeon, Duhui, Flurina
Shohei, Nari, Hyeyeon, Duhui, Flurina

Welcome to Lexis’ Brisbane City Campus. We hope you achieve your study goals and enjoy our great city too. Don’t forget to check out some of the amazing beaches only an hour or two away by public transport.

Dave’s weekly tips and tricks for teachers!

Concept Checking Questions

As a teacher, there are a couple of things we should never say or do to our students. For example, pointing at them and laughing when they make a mistake is often frowned upon and will most likely result in an upset student, poor classroom atmosphere, and a newly unemployed teacher. But this, in my opinion, isn’t the worst thing a teacher can say or do in the classroom. In my opinion, the worst thing a teacher can do happens regularly throughout the English language teaching industry and often goes unnoticed. It involves three simple words and is of absolutely no use to teacher or student – the question ‘Do you understand?’

In response to this question, nine times out of ten students will reply with a nodding of their heads, leading the inexperienced TESOL teacher to believe that they all ‘get it’. In actual fact, most students are reluctant to admit in front of a class that they do not understand something and so other methods must be used to check students’ understanding.

One useful method of doing this is through the use of Concept Checking Questions (CCQs). CCQs can be used to highlight the meaning of the target language item, be it vocabulary or a structure. They can be used to point students in the right direction when they are unsure and help teachers recognise whether or not their presentations have been effective.

To work out the CCQs for a particular piece of language, you first need to work out the concept for yourself. For example:

I managed to open the window

When breaking down this sentence into simple statements we can see that:

  1. I opened the window
  2. It was difficult.

So to create our CCQs, we simply turn these sentences into questions:

  1. Did I open the window? (Yes)
  2. Was it easy? (No)
  3. But did I succeed? (Yes)

Seems simple enough, right? But there are a few other things to remember:

  • CCQs should be easy to understand – you’re not checking their comprehension of the questions themselves
  • They should not contain the word or structure being taught – how can you check understanding of something they don’t know by using the exact language they don’t know?

DaveDave Fox is an experienced teacher and teacher trainer who has worked in Australia, the UK, and Europe

 

 

%d bloggers like this: